Tag Archives: East Lamoine (Maine)

Eighteen Hundred and Froze to Death…The Summer that Wasn’t

What famous horror movie was written in 1816, the year without a summer? (Answer at end of post.)

The Poverty Year…The Year Without a Summer…Year of Distress

I’m currently writing about an 1816 wedding in Trenton (now East Lamoine), Maine. Thus, this post will concentrate on Maine.

Imagine, if you will, June and July and August having a foot of snow covering the ground, and temperatures, day after day, well below freezing.

That’s what it was like in Continue reading

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Launching of the Intertwined Love (a novel) Blog Site

     A Hancock County, Maine, woman recently heard an intriguingly story about the region’s history: a refugee from the French Revolution, Madame Rosalie de Leval, attempted to develop a French community in Hancock and Washington counties in 1791.

     Both the storyteller and the listener concurred that Madame’s story should be written. The woman researched Madame’s name on the Internet. In doing so, she found this blog site.

     She called me. I assured her that the story was already being written.

     Welcome to the launching of www.intertwinedlove.wordpress.com, a blog site designed to inform you about the progress of and the background of my historic romance novel, Intertwined Love. To read its synopsis click on https://intertwinedlove.wordpress.com/intertwined-love-the-novel/.

     To celebrate, a prize will be sent to the person making the most comments between June 15-July 4, 2010.

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     I’ve worked on this project for many years. It’s finally in the “writing” stage.

     Intertwined Love evolved out of research of the East Lamoine, Maine, branch of my family genealogy.

     These ancestors—Mary Googins, daughter of Rogers and Elizabeth Welch Googins, and Louis des Isles, a refugee from the French Revolution, who married Mary in 1796, are main characters in Intertwined Love.

     des Isles descendents (Eugene des Isles, Sue, nee des Isles, and Gladys Vigent) and visits to East Lamoine introduced me to the East Lamoine’s oral history, from which I learned about Madame. Extensive research disclosed her negotiations with Gen. Henry Knox, Col. Continue reading

Amish Grace, Thomas Cornell, & Intertwined Love: Risks of Writing Historical Fiction

 

     “…the most disturbing aspect of the upcoming television move “Amish Grace” is the fictional liberties it takes in depicting the aftermath of the 2006 killings of five Amish girls in a Nickel Mines schoolhouse,” according to Herman Bontrager, an Akron man who acted as a spokesman for the Nickel Mines Amish community after the shootings. “Amish tell the truth and are accustomed to telling the truth. When you take an account like this, and make it appear like it happened, and fictionalize it, that’s troubling.”*

     Authors of the book on which the movie is based, “Amish Grace: How Forgiveness Transcended Tragedy,” agree on this point.**

     Fiction based on an actual historical framework is always up for criticism. It’s an issue I’ve been aware of since I began delving in writing my novel, “Intertwined Love.” Its historical framework includes 1790s people, both the well known— Henry Knox, William Duer, William Bingham, Alexander Baring, Thomas Jefferson among them—and the less well known: Franco van Berckle, Madame Rosalie de Leval, Louis des Isles, Mary Googins, and Joseph Swett.

     I encountered the criticism issue  in two situations. First, my in-depth research disproved Continue reading